Port Gamble Bay Cleanup About to Begin – WSDOE

Photo WA St. DOE

Photo WA St. DOE

A long-awaited cleanup of Port Gamble Bay is just about ready to launch. Work is scheduled to start Monday, with the removal of old pilings treated with toxic creosote.

A number of other piers, docks and other structures also will be removed as the project progresses, and contaminated sediments and other muck will be dug out of the bay or capped with clean material.

The project is expected to continue into early 2017 and really provide a boost for the bay’s health — and for the Puget Sound environment in general.

New video – Restoration on the Dungeness River

Just completed and launched the video ” Working for the River: Restoring the Dungeness”.  Shot over the last 6 months.

The Dungeness River flows from the Olympic Mountains, down through the Sequim Valley, and into the Strait of Juan de Fuca near Dungeness Bay. It drains a watershed area of almost 270 square miles. While recent returns of Pink salmon to the Dungeness have been robust, a variety of human activities over the past century has resulted in the listing of four other Dungeness salmon stocks as threatened under ESA. This film tells the story of some of the efforts to restore the river over the last 25 years –by landowners, farmers, tribes, irrigation districts, and other partners– and how you can help.

This is the long version, 15+ minutes but has the complete story.

This is the short version, 7  minutes.

New shoreline restoration project in Jefferson County – NW Straits.org

It was a blustery day when Jefferson MRC members, Northwest Straits Commission and Northwest Straits Foundation staff, and others recently toured the site of beach restoration planned at Fort Townsend State Park. The MRC is partnering with Washington State Parks and the Foundation to restore shoreline that has been dramatically altered by rip rap, decommissioned military wharves, and related construction. Spawning herring and surf smelt have been documented close by.

The project design is now out for bid; work will restore forage fish habitat and improve access to the beach for kayakers and other visitors.


Peninsula salmon projects get $4.5 million – PDN

Lots of good projects that are going to give jobs to folks here on the Peninsula, and help restore salmon habitat. The work is far from being completed, but it’s good to see these projects and land purchases get funded. Tying this together with the work described by Earth Economics over the weekend on this site, it’s worth it to note that there is value in these ecosystem renewal projects. Slowing the rivers by putting in log jams, for example, do not just provide scientifically proven habitat for salmon (especially young salmon migrating downstream), but they also aide in flood protection among other benefits. Flood plain protection is a value that lowers the cost to repairing damage from floods over multiple decades.

The state has awarded $4.5 million in grants for new salmon restoration projects on the North Olympic Peninsula. ….

Rob Ollikainen reports.

There’s quite a bit more to the story at:



Support local journalism, subscribe to the Peninsula Daily News.

EVENT: Sept 21st in PA – Peabody Creek Restoration

EVENT: Sept 21st in PA - Peabody Creek Restoration

Want a chance to get outside and do some good for your ‘hood? Here you go.

Groups Set On Twin Rivers Restoration–PDN

Another possible restoration of the shoreline from past industrial work. Helps restore for benefit of some of the best steelhead runs left.

JOYCE — Multiple agencies, both public and private, want to restore a chunk of land roughly 20 miles west of Joyce and are planning a community meeting to update local residents on the status of the project.


Return of the kings! Chinook salmon observed in undammed portion of Elwha River – Park & PDN

As the old saying goes, “nature abhors a vacuum”. The Olympic National Park have announced (and reported and commented on by The Peninsula Daily News) that chinook (King) salmon have been spotted above the site of the lower of the two dams that have been removed. This is the first time in almost a century that they have been able to reach this location. In addition to the Kings, Steelhead have also been seen in above the first dam.

The power of restoration again shows that once a place has been restored, nature tries and fill it, if the species still are alive.

The news bulletin from the park

Additional information on the story at the PDN.



Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 391 other followers

%d bloggers like this: