Port Townsend City Council puts water restrictions into effect – PDN

So we are now in Phase 1 drought condition.The city is looking for everyone to effect a 10% reduction in water use. Please water only on every other day, which frankly, if you are doing it correctly, you should already be doing! Your ornamentals, if they are not native and drought tolerant, should be only watered deeply once a week. I’ve noticed that my drought tolerant natives and grasses are not seeming to need any water this summer. Soak the roots of the most vulnerable ones. The mill is being addressed separately.Odd that the Co-op is using more water than Safeway!? Charlie Bermant reports.

The Port Townsend City Council on Monday night unanimously approved Stage 1 water restrictions that include requiring outdoor watering on alternate days.


Lack of water could temporarily shut down Port Townsend Paper Corp. mill – PDN

Charlie Berman reports on the ongoing discussions between the city of Port Townsend and the PT Paper Mill Corp. As stated in the article, it appears that the City is using approx. 2 Million gallons a day (previous estimates I’ve read placed it at 1 M gallons but perhaps this is based on older information). The mill uses approx 8 Million gallons a day currently,and even in temporary shutdown could still use a significant amount. Read the whole story and support local journalism by subscribing to the Peninsula Daily News.


Citizen science proves a draw for new program manager at Port Townsend Marine Science Center – PDN

We wish Susan all the best. Looks like she is a great new hire for the role.

Programs in which volunteers participate in science research attracted the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s new program manager to the nonprofit organization. “One of the things that drew me to the marine science center is its reputation for citizen science, and I think that’s been kept secret,” said Susan Bullerdick, who started her new position last Sunday….  She worked for the Seattle Aquarium for 10 years. For seven of those years, she served as the operations manager for Centers for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE), a collaboration among the Seattle Aquarium, the Ocean Inquiry Project and the University of Washington Oceanography department and College of Education. Charlie Bermant reports. (Peninsula Daily News)


$1.12 million rain garden project in Port Angeles nears completion – PDN

New raingardens are being implemented in PA and here in PT. WSU  will be doing some talking about them today, actually.

A $1.12 million stormwater project in west Port Angeles to relieve flooding and improve stormwater runoff water quality is nearly complete. The city has installed rain gardens at eight intersections on South H, K, L and M streets, as well as a new, larger drain pipe system to relieve flood problems on South H Street. Rain gardens are designed to transfer surface stormwater to groundwater by providing planted “wells” for water to pool and soak into the ground, rather than entering the stormwater system, and to provide a natural filter for surface stormwater. Arwyn Rice reports. (Peninsula Daily News)


And in Port Townsend:

Catching the Rain: Rain Gardens 101

Thurs. Nov. 20, 5-6 pm

WSU Extension Office, 380 Jefferson St, Port Townsend

Stormwater from landscapes and roadways is the number one contributor of pollutants to Puget Sound.  Bob Simmons, Water Resources Specialist with WSU Extension, is presenting a free 1-hour seminar on the basics of rain gardens–how rain gardens help improve water quality, what rain gardens are and how they work, and the four steps to creating and sustaining a rain garden.  The newest “how to” manual from WSU will be also available (or you can download it from www.raingarden.wsu.edu).  Attending this workshop provides an introduction to the Nov. 24-25th installation events, but is not required to participate in those events.


Please RSVP to Sally Chapin, WSU Extension (360-379-5610 x 200 or wsujeffersoncounty@gmail.com.).

Rain Garden Planting

Mon, Nov. 24, 1 – 4 pm

Tues Nov. 25, 9 am – 12 noon

Garfield St., Port Townsend

Learn by doing, whether you are new to rain gardens or already a pro.  Join WSU Extension, Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee and the City of Port Townsend as we install two new rain gardens on Garfield Street.  WSU experts Erica Guttman and Bob Simmons will provide instruction and answer all your questions as we plant two new rain gardens to treat stormwater before it flows into Port Townsend Bay. Bring your own digging tools, gloves, etc. More details when you register.


Please RSVP to Sally Chapin, WSU Extension (360-379-5610 x 200 or wsujeffersoncounty@gmail.com.).  Let her know which workday(s) you prefer.

PT Event: Rain Garden Installation and Training Nov 20 and 25

The MRC rain garden project on Garfield Street, Port Townsend, will be installed next week. This project is in partnership with the MRC, City of Port Townsend and WSU Extension.  Rain gardens are a great way to mitigate storm water runoff that ends up in storm sewers that empty into the Salish Sea (check out the large one next to the Maritime Center in PT for example. It drains much of the streets above the site).
WSU Extension is also offering a 1-hour educational intro to rain gardens.  We’d love your participation for any of the associated activities—invite a friend!. Here’s a summary:
Storm water from landscapes and roadways is the number one contributor of pollutants to Puget Sound.  Bob Simmons, Water Resources Specialist with WSU Extension, is providing a 1-hour seminar at the WSU Extension offices (380 Jefferson St, Port Townsend)  to help you learn what rain gardens are and how they work, and the four steps to creating and sustaining a rain garden.  WSU Rain Garden Handbooks (the newest “how to” manual from WSU) will be available at the workshop.   To register for the 1-hour program, call WSU Jefferson Extension at 360-379-5610 ext 200 or email wsujeffersoncounty@gmail.com .
INSTALLING RAIN GARDENS  Mon. Nov. 24 from 1-4 pm & Tues. Nov. 25 from 9 am-12
Sign up for a hands-on opportunity to help install a rain garden on Mon. Nov. 24 and/or Tues. Nov. 25 . To register for the installation project, see contact info above. You do not need to attend the evening lecture to volunteer for the installation.

Event: How Do Our Hazardous Waste Site Cleanups Compare?

Thursday, November 20, 2014

6:30 PM   The Landing Mall – Second Floor

115E.Railroad Avenue     Port Angeles WA


Dr. Peter L. deFur will be in Port Angeles on Thursday, November 20 to give a presentation comparing cleanup sites on which he is working in USEPA Region 10 — Rayonier-Port Angeles Harbor, Seattle Duwamish River and Portland Harbor.

He will cover the contaminants at each site, compare cleanup options and plans for each site, cover alternative cleanup methods available to be used on particular contaminants, and compare agency support of the citizen groups at the different sites.

These cleanups are overseen by the WA State Department of Ecology and/or the USEPA.  In WA State, these cleanups are part of the Puget Sound Partnership Cleanup Initiative.  The Rayonier-Port Angeles Harbor and the Duwamish River are  Ecology priority cleanup sites.

Dr. Peter L. deFur is president and owner of the consulting firm Environmental Stewardship Concepts, LLC, based in Henrico VA.  and an Affiliate Associate Professor in the Center for Environmental Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond VA.   Dr. deFur has research and practical experience in the areas of ecological risk assessment, environmental regulations and policies, and toxicology.

Dr. deFur received his B.S. and M.A. degrees in Biology from the College of William and Mary, in Virginia, and a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Calgary, Alberta.  He has held faculty positions at George Mason University and Southeastern Louisiana University before joining the staff of the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) in Washington, DC.  In 1996, deFur formed an independent private consulting firm, Environmental Stewardship Concepts, LLC, and accepted a part-time position at VCU.

Dr. deFur has extensive experience in human health risk assessment and ecological risk assessment regulations, guidance and policy. He served on the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council (NAS/NRC )Risk Characterization Committee that prepared Understanding Risk, on several subsequent study committees and served on the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology from 1996 to 1999. He presently serves on the/NRC/NAS committee on Uranium Mining in Virginia. He served on a number of scientific reviews of EPA ecological and human health risk assessments, including the Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment, the assessment for the WTI incinerator in Ohio and EPA’s Ecological Risk Assessment Guidelines. Dr. deFur was a member of each of the three federal advisory committees for EPA’s Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Program. Dr. deFur was chair of the peer review of EPA’s Dioxin Reassessment in 2000.


Darlene Schanfald

Project Coordinator

Rayonier –  Port Angeles Harbor Hazardous Waste Cleanup Project

Olympic Environmental Council Coalition

PO Box 2664

Sequim WA  98382



EVENT: 16 October – Wolf Talk with David Moskowitz

PORT TOWNSEND – Join the JLT Natural History Society and Western Wildlife Outreach on Thursday, October 16, for an entertaining evening of “Wolf Talk” with David Moskowitz, well-known wildlife tracker and author of Wolves in the Land of Salmon. Moskowitz will share stories, images, and video clips from the recent OR7 Expedition, which retraced the wanderings of a young male gray wolf, who traversed more than 1,200 miles through Oregon and into California.

OR-12_Wenaha_male_wolf_odfwThe wolf dubbed OR7 was captured and outfitted with a GPS collar in 2011 by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to follow his journey via satellite signals across multiple mountain ranges, a vast desert, and past numerous towns and cities along the way. OR7 made international news as he wandered to California, becoming the first wolf to be documented there in 90 years. In the spring of 2014 Moskowitz, along with a filmmaker and other stalwart participants, launched an expedition to follow the approximate path of OR7 on foot and by bicycle. The adventurous mission led the team to fresh insights on what it means to share the landscape with large carnivores in the contemporary world.

David will be joined by local carnivore experts, Lorna and Darrell Smith, of the non-profit Western Wildlife Outreach (WWO), who will discuss Washington’s recovering gray wolf population. WWO is a Port Townsend based organization dedicated to providing accurate, science-based information on bears, wolves, and cougars. The organization aims to promote wildlife-safe communities, at the same time striving to restore and maintain healthy populations of these iconic animals, whose roots in the Pacific Northwest extend to millions of years ago.

David Moskowitz is a professional wildlife tracker, photographer, and outdoor educator. He has contributed his technical expertise to a wide variety of wildlife studies, employing tracking and other non-invasive methods to study wildlife ecology and promote conservation. Moscowitz helped establish the Cascade Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project, whose participants search for and observe rare and sensitive wildlife in the Cascades and other Northwest wildlands.

The Natural History Society is an offshoot organization of the Jefferson Land Trust. It was founded in 2012 to foster active exploration, appreciation, understanding, and conservation of the diverse natural environments of the Olympic Peninsula and beyond.

The “Wolf Talk” program will take place at 7:00 pm, Thursday, October 16, at the Cotton Building, 607 Water Street, Port Townsend. This event is free and open to the public. A $5 donation will help defray the costs and support future programs.

For additional information contact:
Noreen Parks
360 379-4007
HYPERLINK “mailto:noreen.parks@gmail.com” noreen.parks@gmail.com


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