China Wants Better Testing For Arsenic In US Shellfish Exports – Earthfix

For the first time, U.S. officials reported on recent meetings in Beijing to discuss China’s ban on shellfish imports from most of the West Coast. Ashley Ahern reports for Earthfix.

Listen or read the whole story at:

http://nwpr.org/post/china-wants-better-testing-arsenic-us-shellfish-exports

Jefferson County – Michelle McConnell leaves for Ecology

Michelle McConnell, who has been a stalwart at the Jefferson County Dept. of Community Development for many years, has chosen to leave and work for the Department of Ecology. Michelle has had the extremely hard job of shepherding the Shoreline Master Program through over the last 8 years. She has always been a steady hand and been a sea of calm in the midst of turbulent public meetings over the SMP. We will miss her guidance on these issues. No word on a replacement yet. Best of luck to Michelle in future endeavors.

I’m pleased to announce I have accepted a new job and will be leaving DCD the week of April 7; my new position will be as a Shoreline Planner with WA Department of Ecology.

I have learned a lot during my eight years with the County and it has been both challenging and rewarding to have served as Project Manager for major, multi-year projects including the Shoreline Master Program Update and Watershed Stewardship Resource Center/SquareONE.  I’m proud of the many positive contributions I’ve made to the never-ending, fast-paced and varied work of DCD.

Thanks to all the good folks I’ve met and worked with along the way!

Best wishes,

Michelle

Port Townsend marine center focuses on local sea life for Friday season opener – PDN

Always a good thing to do with kids or grandkids. 

An intimate display of animals that can be found in local waters will be on view to the public this Friday as the Port Townsend Marine Science Center opens its doors for the season… The marine display, which features 14 tanks with thousands of different animals, is located at the end of the pier that extends from Fort Worden State Park. The new season begins Friday with a public feed where visitors are invited to help feed the animals at 2 p.m.. Charlie Bermant reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

 

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20140325/news/303259996/port-townsend-marine-center-focuses-on-local-sea-life-for-friday

25 Years Later, Exxon Valdez Spill Effects Linger – Associated Press

25 years later, and the pain and destruction just keeps on keepin on. This is why we are so hard core about protecting us from an oil spill. I want to point out that we should be very proud of the Coast Guard here in the Sound that have done an excellent job of vessel traffic control, and our politicians like Representative Kevin Van De Wege who helped push through the rescue tug at Neah Bay (with the help of the Tribes, many governmental and NGOs too over 15 years of work).  There are new threats coming, and the need to be ever vigilant is never going to leave. But we have done a great job up to now. Knock on wood.

Before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico, there was the Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska, at the time the nation’s largest oil spill.

The 987-foot tanker, carrying 53 million gallons of crude, struck Bligh Reef at 12:04 a.m. on March 24, 1989. Within hours, it unleashed an estimated 10.8 million gallons of thick, toxic crude oil into the water. Storms and currents then smeared it over 1,300 miles of shoreline.

Read the whole story at:

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory/25-years-exxon-valdez-spill-effects-linger-22981757

Fukushima Crisis – Georgia Strait Alliance

Looking for a ton of scientific information on the Fukushima Crisis and it’s affects on us? The good folks at the Georgia Strait Alliance in Canada have put this web site up. A web site of web sites. Likely I’ll refer to some of this on the left side of this blog someday as well.

Georgia Strait Alliance has put up a web page to update the crisis: “The devastating explosions in 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear reactors in Japan released huge quantities of radioactive isotopes into the ocean and our atmosphere….”

Fukushima Crisis

Feds OK Snohomish County PUD’s Tidal Power Project In Admiralty Inlet – KPLU

Ok. It’s time to get this first phase built and find out it’s shortcomings, and positive sides. Every method of electricity generation has a cost, environmentally. Even solar panels have their minerals mined somewhere, likely without much environmental oversight.  So let’s get this extremely benign appearing generation trial in the water and up and running. Once there, we can judge whether it’s worth the environmental costs. My guess, is it’s not going to be anywhere near as bad as even wind has turned out to be (bird deaths have been a major problem in wind sites).

Federal regulators have given unanimous approval for an underwater energy project powered by the tides in Washington’s Admiralty Inlet. Two turbines will take advantage of the fast-moving currents and daily tidal movements in the busy passage west of Whidbey Island, at a depth of about 200 feet. Snohomish County PUD says the turbines will be connected to the electrical grid with cables that emerge on leased land south of the ferry dock in Coupeville. Bellamy Pailthorp reports. (KPLU)

Feds OK Snohomish County PUD’s Tidal Power Project In Admiralty Inlet 

Oil And Water Don’t Mix— Never Have – Salish Sea Communications

From my good friend Mike Sato:

I learned about the Exxon Valdez going aground 25 years ago while working in corporate communications for the investor-owned utility, Hawaiian Electric Company. We sadly watched the national news for days as 11 million gallons of oil spread and coated the pristine shorelines.

Read the rest of the story at:

http://salishseacommunications.blogspot.com/2014/03/oil-and-water-dont-mix-never-have.html

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